Organizing Kid’s Rooms – Part Two

  Organizing has, there are many options.
Let’s start with
a toy library .

 

In organizing a child’s room, tailor the effort to the child.

Use open bins that are easy for children to see toys, games and books. Do not overcrowd the bins-make it easy for the child to place the item back in the bin when it’s time to tidy up.

Like clothing, they often have far too many toys, books and games.

Quarterlyevery season swap out some of the items.

  1. Get a bin or two (max) with a lid and place in it the toys, games and books your child still loves, needs and uses. Yes, place all these items in the same bin(s). Clear bins are best, BUT do not buy new if you can re-use something you have on hand. Labeled boxes will work just as well.
  2. If your child has outgrown the items this is a good time to pack that box for charity. If you are not certain about the relevance of the items-place them in the keeper bin.
  3. Place the bin(s) back in the basement or another storage space.
  4. The next season when it’s time to swap out their clothing, do the same with these items. Again, a good time to re-think some of the items in the bin that you realize your child has outgrown.

It’s not necessary to get rid of all those wonderful items that friends, family and you have purchased as gifts. It’s just a time to manage them and what was old becomes new again!

The premier rule for efficient children’s storage – Make it easier to put something away than it is to get it out.

Example: store picture books as a flip-file, standing upright in a plastic bin. The child flips through the books, makes his/her selection, and tosses the book in the front of the bin when finished.

Build the effort into getting the item out, not putting it away.

  1. Organize bottom to top

Start organizing from the bottom of the room, and work to the top. Most used toys and belongings are best placed on lower shelves, in lower drawers, or on the floor. Higher levels are designated for less-frequently-used possessions.

Older kids can utilize higher closet or open shelves to “store” some of their belongings. Clear plastic shoe box storage containers hold small pieces and easily identify the contents. Various sizes of decorator boxes with lids also work well.

  1. Label, label, label

When it comes to keeping kids’ rooms organized for the long haul, labels save the day!

If they don’t read yet cut out a picture of the item and tape it to the bin or box. Clear packing tape will hold the item in place and ensure that it will stay in place.

  1. Build a maintenance routine

Help your children by building maintenance routines into your family’s day. “Morning Pickup” straighten the comforter, returns the pillow to the bed, and gets yesterday’s clothing to the laundry hamper. “Evening Pickup” precedes getting pj’s on for bed, and involves putting away the day’s toys.

Keep it simple!

Building organizing routines into your family’s schedule
will help keep disorder from becoming overwhelming.

 

Stayed tuned for more
how to organizing solutions from
the 
Living Organized® 101 Series

 

 

 



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